S

Salted Caramel & Apricot Pots De Creme

About Me

Hey guys! As a Dietitian Nutritionist, nutrition is my jam. NS—your source for a balanced wellbeing. Here you’ll find simple and delicious recipes, an awesome community, health advice, and all things to keep you feeling your best. Live Whole. Eat Well. Feel Amazing.

Looking for Something Else?

There is inspi­ra­tion in the art that enters into the pro­duc­tion of a French din­ner, in the per­fect bal­ance of every item from hors d’oeuvre to café noir, in the ways with sea­son­ing that work mir­a­cles with left-overs and pre­serve the dai­ly rou­tine of three meals a day from the dead­ly monot­o­ny of the Amer­i­can régime, in the gar­nish­ings that glo­ri­fy the most insignif­i­cant con­coc­tions into objects of appetis­ing beau­ty and in the sauces that ele­vate indif­fer­ent dish­es into the realm of cre­ations and enable a French cook to turn out a din­ner fit for capri­cious young gods from what an Amer­i­can cook wastes in prepar­ing one.

How to make pure food, bet­ter food and to econ­o­mize on the cost of same is just now tax­ing the atten­tion and inge­nu­ity of domes­tic sci­ence teach­ers and food experts gen­er­al­ly. The aver­age house­wife is intense­ly inter­est­ed in the result of these find­ings, and must keep in touch with them to keep up with the times and run her home in an intel­li­gent and eco­nom­i­cal as well as health­ful rou­tine.

To have a thor­ough under­stand­ing of their good­ness one must not only read about them but taste them. They are the sta­ple diet in many for­eign coun­tries and in the Armour brand the native fla­vor­ing has been done with remark­able faithfulness—so much so that large quan­ti­ties are shipped from this coun­try every week to the coun­tries where they orig­i­nat­ed.

“Do all kitchen work in a cer­tain order, using that rou­tine which expe­ri­ence has proved best.”

The sim­ple desserts are the best desserts, and none is more pleas­ing to the eye and the palate or so eas­i­ly made or so fre­quent­ly served in an imper­fect man­ner, than cus­tards.

With a sup­ply of good eggs in the pantry the cook need nev­er be at a loss for a tasty cus­tard, and if she is wise enough to buy Armour’s Fan­cy Selects when she orders eggs from her mar­ket man their good­ness will be reflect­ed in her desserts. Aside from their good­ness their extra large size will always rec­om­mend their use to the wise house­wife. They come packed in an extra large car­ton.

Salted Caramel & Apricot Pots De Creme

  • Serv­ings: 2–4
  • Dif­fi­cul­ty: easy
  • Print

For the top­ping, I sim­mered down some rhubarb with fresh straw­ber­ries, sug­ar, a dash of water, and the husk of the vanil­la bean pod that was left after I scraped it out. This made the most refresh­ing & tangy syrup with a won­der­ful­ly sweet but not over­ly so fla­vor that only vanil­la can bring.

Ingredients

  • 1 quart of cream
  • 12 pound of sug­ar
  • 4 ounces of sweet almonds
  • 1 table­spoon­ful of caramel
  • 1 tea­spoon­ful of vanil­la extract
  • 4 table­spoon­fuls of sher­ry
  • 3 half inch slices of Boston Brown Bread
  • 1 tea­spoon­ful of vanil­la or
  • 14 of a vanil­la bean or
  • a tea­spoon­ful of vanil­la extract

Directions

  1. Pre­heat the oven to 325 degrees Fahren­heit. Put half the cream and all the sug­ar over the fire and stir until the sug­ar is dis­solved; take from the fire, and, when per­fect­ly cold, add the remain­ing half of the cream. Freeze the mix­ture, and add the bananas mashed or pressed through a colan­der. Put on the lid, adjust the crank, and turn until the mix­ture is frozen rather hard.
  2. Grate and sift the bis­cuits. Scald half the cream and the sug­ar; when cold, add the remain­ing cream and the vanil­la, and freeze. When frozen, remove the dash­er, stir in the pow­dered bis­cuits, and repack to ripen.
  3.  As soon as the cus­tard begins to thick­en the saucepan must be tak­en from the fire and the stir­ring con­tin­ued for a sec­ond or two longer. If the cook­ing is done in a dou­ble boil­er the risk of boil­ing is very much less­ened.
  4. Blanch and pound or grate the nuts. Put half the cream and all the sug­ar in a dou­ble boil­er; stir until the sug­ar is dis­solved and stand aside to cool; when cold, add the nuts, the fla­vor­ing and the remain­ing cream, mix, add the col­or­ing, and turn into the freez­er to freeze. If green col­or­ing mat­ter is not at hand, a lit­tle spinach or pars­ley may be chopped and rubbed with a small quan­ti­ty of alco­hol.
  5.  Before you send it to table, split the vanil­la bean, scrape out the seeds and add them to the hot cream, and add the bean bro­ken into pieces. Stir until the sug­ar is dis­solved, and strain through a colan­der. When this is cold, add the remain­ing cream and freeze. This should be repacked and giv­en two hours to ripen. Four would be bet­ter.
  6. Allow it to bake for 45–50 min­utes. Make an infu­sion of cof­fee by pour­ing half a pint of boil­ing milk on a heap­ing table­spoon­ful of pow­dered cof­fee. Put it aside to set­tle, and when cold strain off the milk and use with the eggs as in pre­vi­ous recipe.

Tips: As soon as the cus­tard begins to thick­en the saucepan must be tak­en from the fire and the stir­ring con­tin­ued for a sec­ond or two longer. If the cook­ing is done in a dou­ble boil­er the risk of boil­ing is very much less­ened.

It is a wise plan to keep a vari­ety of Sum­mer Sausage on hand, as in a very few min­utes deli­cious sand­wich­es may be pre­pared with this, these sand­wich­es hav­ing the charm of nov­el­ty. It is impos­si­ble to deal in a short arti­cle with the many vari­eties of Sum­mer Sausage, but there are three or four which can be touched upon. To have a thor­ough under­stand­ing of their good­ness one must not only read about them but taste them. They are the sta­ple diet in many for­eign coun­tries and in the Armour brand the native fla­vor­ing has been done with remark­able faithfulness—so much so that large quan­ti­ties are shipped from this coun­try every week to the coun­tries where they orig­i­nat­ed.

With a sup­ply of good eggs in the pantry the cook need nev­er be at a loss for a tasty cus­tard, and if she is wise enough to buy Armour’s Fan­cy Selects when she orders eggs from her mar­ket man their good­ness will be reflect­ed in her desserts. Aside from their good­ness their extra large size will always rec­om­mend their use to the wise cook. They come packed in an extra large car­ton.

Georgie Forman
Georgie Forman

I’m a London-based qualified and registered organic process therapist. I consider victimization real food to help people feel their best. I’m a firm believer that real food ar typically straightforward, and simple to bring into your life. I take a awfully smart approach that is realistic for my purchasers.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *