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Big Bear and Caramel Cupcake S’Mores

If you are for­tu­nate enough to pos­sess a wide porch or a stretch of lawn do not for­get your less for­tu­nate friends, and give an occa­sion­al infor­mal par­ty there while the weath­er is still fine. Food always tastes so much bet­ter in the fresh air and when friends are present it makes the affair noth­ing more than a kind of glo­ri­fied pic­nic. There are few more pleas­ant ways of enter­tain­ing than by giv­ing a porch par­ty.

Prepare as much as pos­si­ble ear­ly in the day. If you have sand­wich­es wrap them in a damp nap­kin; if cold drinks are want­ed have them well chilled, your glass­es and straws handy, have your sil­ver and chi­na ready at hand so that when your guests arrive you may devote your time and atten­tion to them. The fol­low­ing menus are not hard to pre­pare and the dish­es will be found most palat­able and suit­ed to every purse: Veribest Canned Meats, the stand­by of the house­wife who com­bines econ­o­my of time with excel­lence of qual­i­ty, are used in many of them.

In almost every, land where cheese is made you can sam­ple a hand­ful of less­er Blues and imi­ta­tions of the invin­ci­ble three and try to clas­si­fy them, until you’re blue in the face. The best we can do in this slight sum­ma­ry is to men­tion a few of the most notable, aside from our own Blues of Min­neso­ta, Wis­con­sin, Ore­gon and oth­er states that major in cheese.

Take a quart of water, half a bushel of Flow­ers, cut off the whites, and with a sieve sift away the seeds, bruise them a lit­tle; let your water be boiled, and a lit­tle cold again, then put in your Flow­ers, and let them stand close cov­ered twen­ty four hours; you may put in but half the flow­ers at a time, the strength will come out the bet­ter; to that liquor put in four pound of sug­ar, let it lye in all night, next day boil it in a Gal­lipot, set it in a pot of water, and there let it boil till all the sug­ar be melt­ed and the syrup be pret­ty thick, then take it out, and let it stand in that till it be through cold, then glass it.

The fol­low­ing menus are not hard to pre­pare and the dish­es will be found most palat­able and suit­ed to every purse: Veribest Canned Meats, the stand­by of the house­wife who com­bines econ­o­my of time with excel­lence of qual­i­ty, are used in many of them. There is a wide range of these meats deli­cious and many ways of using them. Every pantry should have at least one shelf devot­ed to them so that the house­wife need nev­er be at a loss for the basis of a good meal.

The treats are depend­ably an appre­ci­at­ed expan­sion. I made the fill­ing two diverse cours­es here, for the first I cooked down a few cran­ber­ries with sug­ar, then blend­ed that with Ver­mont Cream­ery mas­car­pone ched­dar and fla­vors for a tart, cheese­cake, and some­what sweet fill­ing.

The fol­low­ing menus are not hard to pre­pare and the dish­es will be found most palat­able and suit­ed to every purse: Veribest Canned Meats, the stand­by of the house­wife who com­bines econ­o­my of time with excel­lence of qual­i­ty, are used in many of them. There is a wide range of these meats deli­cious and many ways of using them. Every pantry should have at least one shelf devot­ed to them so that the house­wife need nev­er be at a loss for the basis of a good meal.

Take a quart of water, half a bushel of Flow­ers, cut off the whites, and with a sieve sift away the seeds, bruise them a lit­tle; let your water be boiled, and a lit­tle cold again, then put in your Flow­ers, and let them stand close cov­ered twen­ty four hours; you may put in but half the flow­ers at a time, the strength will come out the bet­ter; to that liquor put in four pound of Sug­ar, let it lye in all night, next day boil it in a Gal­lipot, set it in a pot of water, and there let it boil till all the Sug­ar be melt­ed and the syrup be pret­ty thick, then take it out, and let it stand in that till it be through cold, then glass it.

Take a pound of sug­ar, dis­solve it in thin fair water, when it is boiled a lit­tle while, put in your Cher­ries after they are stoned, four pound to one pound of Sug­ar, let them lye in the Sug­ar three dayes, then take them out of the syrup and lay them on sieves one by one, and set them before the Sun upon stools, turn them every day, else they will mould; when they look of a dark red colour, and are dry then put them up. And so you may do any man­ner of Fruit. In the Sun is the best dry­ing of them, put into the syrup some juice of Rasps.

To have a thor­ough under­stand­ing of their good­ness one must not only read about them but taste them.

It is impos­si­ble to deal in a short arti­cle with the many vari­eties of Sum­mer Sausage, but there are three or four which can be touched upon. To have a thor­ough under­stand­ing of their good­ness one must not only read about them but taste them. They are the sta­ple diet in many for­eign coun­tries and in the Armour brand the native fla­vor­ing has been done with remark­able faithfulness—so much so that large quan­ti­ties are shipped from this coun­try every week to the coun­tries where they orig­i­nat­ed.

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