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Linzer Cookies with Cranberry Mascarpone

There is inspi­ra­tion in the art that enters into the pro­duc­tion of a French din­ner, in the per­fect bal­ance of every item from hors d’oeuvre to café noir, in the ways with sea­son­ing that work mir­a­cles with left-overs and pre­serve the dai­ly rou­tine of three meals a day from the dead­ly monot­o­ny of the Amer­i­can régime, in the gar­nish­ings that glo­ri­fy the most insignif­i­cant con­coc­tions into objects of appetis­ing beau­ty and in the sauces that ele­vate indif­fer­ent dish­es into the realm of cre­ations and enable a French cook to turn out a din­ner fit for capri­cious young gods from what an Amer­i­can cook wastes in prepar­ing one.

How to make pure food, bet­ter food and to econ­o­mize on the cost of same is just now tax­ing the atten­tion and inge­nu­ity of domes­tic sci­ence teach­ers and food experts gen­er­al­ly. The aver­age cook is intense­ly inter­est­ed in the result of these find­ings, and must keep in touch with them to keep up with the times and run her home in an intel­li­gent and eco­nom­i­cal as well as health­ful rou­tine.

It is a wise plan to keep a vari­ety of Sum­mer Sausage on hand, as in a very few min­utes deli­cious sand­wich­es may be pre­pared with this, these sand­wich­es hav­ing the charm of nov­el­ty. It is impos­si­ble to deal in a short arti­cle with the many vari­eties of Sum­mer Sausage, but there are three or four which can be touched upon. To have a thor­ough under­stand­ing of their good­ness one must not only read about them but taste them. They are the sta­ple diet in many for­eign coun­tries and in the Armour brand the native fla­vor­ing has been done with remark­able faithfulness—so much so that large quan­ti­ties are shipped from this coun­try every week to the coun­tries where they orig­i­nat­ed.

“Do all kitchen work in a cer­tain order, using that rou­tine which expe­ri­ence has proved best for you.”

The sim­ple desserts are the best desserts, and none is more pleas­ing to the eye and the palate or so eas­i­ly made or so fre­quent­ly served in an imper­fect man­ner, than cus­tards.

With a sup­ply of good eggs in the pantry the cook need nev­er be at a loss for a tasty cus­tard, and if she is wise enough to buy Armour’s Fan­cy Selects when she orders eggs from her mar­ket man their good­ness will be reflect­ed in her desserts. Aside from their good­ness their extra large size will always rec­om­mend their use to the wise cook. They come packed in an extra large car­ton.

One will not find the del­i­catessen flour­ish­ing in France—one will not find it at all—and the fan­cy gro­cery, above men­tioned, is anoth­er pit­fall for the Amer­i­can house­wife. She likes the sight of food done up in fan­cy con­tain­ers, in glass, per­haps, and buys them, not real­iz­ing that she is pay­ing a large price for per­fect­ly unnec­es­sary and total­ly unnour­ish­ing pret­ties.

Pumpkin Pancakes with Apple Compote and Candied Nuts

  • Serv­ings: 4–6
  • Dif­fi­cul­ty: easy
  • Print

For the top­ping, I sim­mered down some rhubarb with fresh straw­ber­ries, sug­ar, a dash of water, and the husk of the vanil­la bean pod that was left after I scraped it out. This made the most refresh­ing & tangy syrup with a won­der­ful­ly sweet but not over­ly so fla­vor that only vanil­la can bring.

Ingredients

  • 34 cup unsalt­ed cul­tured but­ter
  • 12 cup sug­ar
  • 34 cup almond meal
  • 12 tea­spoon cin­na­mon
  • 14 tea­spoon salt
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 tea­spoon vanil­la extract
  • 2 table­spoons pow­dered sug­ar
  • 1 tea­spoon orange zest
  • 1 cup flour

Directions

  1. Boil the sug­ar, water and tar­tar­ic acid five min­utes. When near­ly cold beat into the syrup the whites of the eggs, beat­en until foamy, and the fla­vor­ing extract. Store in a fruit jar, close­ly cov­ered. To use, put three table­spoon­fuls into a glass half full of cold water, stir in one-fourth a tea­spoon­ful of soda, and drink while effer­vesc­ing.
  2. A pint of any kind of fruit juice may dis­place the water, when a tea­spoon­ful of lemon juice should be added to the con­tents of each glass before stir­ring in the soda.
  3. Pre­heat the oven to 350 degrees Fahren­heit. Grate the choco­late, put it in a dou­ble boil­er with the milk; stir until hot, and add the sug­ar, vanil­la, cin­na­mon and one pint of the cream. When cold, freeze; when frozen, remove the dash­er and stir in the remain­ing pint of the cream whipped to a stiff froth.
  4. In a large bowl, mix togeth­er the flour, salt, bak­ing pow­der, bak­ing soda, and cin­na­mon. Mash the rasp­ber­ries; add half the sug­ar and the lemon juice. Put the remain­ing sug­ar and half the cream in a dou­ble boil­er; stir until the sug­ar is dis­solved, and stand aside to cool; when cold, add the remain­ing cream, turn the mix­ture into the freez­er, and stir until part­ly frozen.

Tips & Tricks: I made the fill­ing two dif­fer­ent ways here, for the first one I cooked down some cran­ber­ries with sug­ar, then mixed that with Ver­mont Cream­ery mas­car­pone cheese and spices for a tangy, cheese­cake-y, and slight­ly sweet fill­ing. For the oth­er, I sliced per­sim­mons and boiled them in a cin­na­mon syrup until they soft­ened, then I cut shapes out of them with a cook­ie cut­ter so that they would fit in the linz­er cook­ie sand­wich­es.

If she is fear­ful of the han­dling some loose food stuffs may be sub­ject­ed to in the stores, why does she not prac­tice the most prac­ti­cal econ­o­my, go to the foun­tain-head of sup­plies in the city, the large mar­ket, and buy in quan­ti­ty, so far as she can? A few ounces of bacon, already sliced, and sealed in a glass dish are, indeed, appetis­ing even in their raw state, while a side of bacon is not, unless looked upon through the eyes of imag­i­na­tion, yet the lat­ter method of pur­chas­ing this com­mod­i­ty is two or three hun­dred per cent cheap­er, and when it arrives at the break­fast table it will be found every bit as appeal­ing to a hap­py morn­ing appetite.

To have a thor­ough under­stand­ing of their good­ness one must not only read about them but taste them. They are the sta­ple diet in many for­eign coun­tries and in the Armour brand the native fla­vor­ing has been done with remark­able faithfulness—so much so that large quan­ti­ties are shipped from this coun­try every week to the coun­tries where they orig­i­nat­ed.

There is inspi­ra­tion in the art that enters into the pro­duc­tion of a French din­ner, in the per­fect bal­ance of every item from hors d’oeuvre to café noir, in the ways with sea­son­ing that work mir­a­cles with left-overs and pre­serve the dai­ly rou­tine of three meals a day from the dead­ly monot­o­ny of the Amer­i­can régime.

  1. Based on the pics, it looks like I can’t make this due to um, lack of skill and lack of ingre­di­ents. But actu­al­ly, this is doable! Very eager to try these Delal­lo prod­ucts, I’m not sure my local store car­ries them, may have to make a request!

    1. Alice Glover says:

      This is genius! This time of year com­fort food and fast do not often go togeth­er. So I am lov­ing some­thing that embod­ies both effi­cient get food on the table and in my bel­ly NOW with a warm healthy and com­fort­ing meal!

    1. George Olaru says:

      Hi Isabel! The bowl is actu­al­ly made by Lindsay’s father-in-law. You can check out his online shop here.

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