S

Salted Almond Chocolate Cake with Violets

About Me

Hey guys! As a Dietitian Nutritionist, nutrition is my jam. NS—your source for a balanced wellbeing. Here you’ll find simple and delicious recipes, an awesome community, health advice, and all things to keep you feeling your best. Live Whole. Eat Well. Feel Amazing.

Looking for Something Else?

Tea, with which we are all so famil­iar, is in real­i­ty a num­ber of dried rolled leaves of the tea plant, Camel­lia Thea, cul­ti­vat­ed chiefly in Chi­na and the con­tigu­ous coun­tries. It is used exces­sive­ly through­out Australasia—for has it not been shown that our four mil­lion peo­ple use more of this bev­er­age than the mil­lions who inhab­it Con­ti­nen­tal Europe, if Rus­sia be except­ed?

How to make pure food, bet­ter food and to econ­o­mize on the cost of same is just now tax­ing the atten­tion and inge­nu­ity of domes­tic sci­ence teach­ers and food experts gen­er­al­ly. The aver­age cook is intense­ly inter­est­ed in the result of these find­ings, and must keep in touch with them to keep up with the times and run her home in an intel­li­gent and eco­nom­i­cal as well as health­ful rou­tine.

It is impos­si­ble to deal in a short arti­cle with the many vari­eties of Sum­mer Sausce, but there are three or four which can be touched upon. To have a thor­ough under­stand­ing of their good­ness one must not only read about them but taste them. They are the sta­ple diet in many for­eign coun­tries and in the Armour brand the native fla­vor­ing has been done with remark­able faithfulness—so much so that large quan­ti­ties are shipped from this coun­try every week to the coun­tries where they orig­i­nat­ed.

“Do all kitchen work in a cer­tain order, using that rou­tine which expe­ri­ence has proved best for you.”

The sim­ple desserts are the best desserts, and none is more pleas­ing to the eye and the palate or so eas­i­ly made or so fre­quent­ly served in an imper­fect man­ner, than cus­tards.

With a sup­ply of good eggs in the pantry the house­wife need nev­er be at a loss for a tasty cus­tard, and if she is wise enough to buy Armour’s Fan­cy Selects when she orders eggs from her mar­ket man their good­ness will be reflect­ed in her desserts. Aside from their good­ness their extra large size will always rec­om­mend their use to the wise house­wife. They come packed in an extra large car­ton.

To have a thor­ough under­stand­ing of their good­ness one must not only read about them but taste them. They are the sta­ple diet in many for­eign coun­tries and in the Armour brand the native fla­vor­ing has been done with remark­able faithfulness—so much so that large quan­ti­ties are shipped from this coun­try every week to the coun­tries where they orig­i­nat­ed.

Salted Almond Chocolate Cake with Violets

  • Serv­ings: 1–2
  • Dif­fi­cul­ty: medi­um
  • Print

For the top­ping, I sim­mered down some rhubarb with fresh straw­ber­ries, sug­ar, a dash of water, and the husk of the vanil­la bean pod that was left after I scraped it out. This made the most refresh­ing & tangy syrup with a won­der­ful­ly sweet but not over­ly so fla­vor that only vanil­la can bring.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup­ful molasses
  • 1 tea­spoon­ful gin­ger
  • 1 tea­spoon­ful cloves
  • 1 tea­spoon­ful cin­na­mon
  • ⅛ tea­spoon­ful nut­meg
  • 1 egg, beat­en light
  • ½ cup­ful sug­ar
  • 1 cup­ful sour milk
  • 1 tea­spoon­ful bak­ing soda
  • 2 cup­fuls flour

Directions

  1. Put half the cream and half the sug­ar in a dou­ble boil­er over the fire; when the sug­ar is dis­solved, stand it aside until cold. Pare and grate the pineap­ple, add the remain­ing half of the sug­ar and stand it aside.
  2. Mash the rasp­ber­ries; add half the sug­ar and the lemon juice. Put the remain­ing sug­ar and half the cream in a dou­ble boil­er; stir until the sug­ar is dis­solved, and stand aside to cool; when cold, add the remain­ing cream, turn the mix­ture into the freez­er, and stir until part­ly frozen. Remove the lid and add the mashed rasp­ber­ries, and stir again for five or ten min­utes until the mix­ture is suf­fi­cient­ly hard to repack.
  3. Make pre­cise­ly the same as rasp­ber­ry ice cream, sub­sti­tut­ing one quart of straw­ber­ries for the rasp­ber­rries.
  4. When the cream is cold, add the remain­ing cream, and part­ly freeze. Then add the lemon juice to the pineap­ple and add it to the frozen cream; turn the freez­er five min­utes longer, and repack.
  5. Put the sug­ar and half the cream over the fire in a dou­ble boil­er; when the sug­ar is dis­solved, stand it aside to cool. When cold, add the remain­ing cream, the wal­nuts, chopped, and the fla­vor­ing, and freeze.
  6. Stir over the fire for a minute, take from the fire, add the vanil­la, and, when cold, add the cream, and freeze.

Tips: Beat the sug­ar and the yolks of the eggs until light, add the well-beat­en whites, and pour into them the cof­fee, boil­ing hot. Stir over the fire for a minute, take from the fire, add the vanil­la, and, when cold, add the cream, and freeze.

I made the fill­ing two dif­fer­ent ways here, for the first one I cooked down some cran­ber­ries with sug­ar, then mixed that with Ver­mont Cream­ery, mas­car­pone cheese and spices for a tangy, cheese­cake-y, and slight­ly sweet fill­ing. I sliced per­sim­mons and boiled them in a cin­na­mon syrup until they soft­ened, then I cut shapes out of them with a cook­ie cut­ter so that they would fit in the linz­er cook­ie sand­wich­es.

After the cream is frozen rather stiff, pre­pare a tub or buck­et of coarse­ly chopped ice, with one-half less salt than you use for freez­ing. To each ten pounds of ice allow one quart of rock salt. Sprin­kle a lit­tle rock salt in the bot­tom of your buck­et or tub, then put over a lay­er of cracked ice, anoth­er lay­er of salt and cracked ice, and on this stand your mold, which is not filled, but is cov­ered with a lid, and pack it all around, leav­ing the top, of course, to pack lat­er on. Take your freez­er near this tub.
Make sure that your pack­ing tub or buck­et has a hole below the top of the mold, so that the salt water will be drained off.

Georgie Forman
Georgie Forman

I’m a London-based qualified and registered organic process therapist. I consider victimization real food to help people feel their best. I’m a firm believer that real food ar typically straightforward, and simple to bring into your life. I take a awfully smart approach that is realistic for my purchasers.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *