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Homemade Kefir and Honey-Roasted Banana Kefir Smoothie

With the kitchen redesign mov­ing grad­u­al­ly, I was expe­ri­enc­ing con­sid­er­able dif­fi­cul­ties hav­ing the capac­i­ty to cook for a devel­oped time­frame, par­tic­u­lar­ly since cook­ing is one of my favored tech­niques for stress alle­vi­a­tion. In this way, this past Fri­day I said ‘to hell­fire with it’ and made a cake in my half torn down kitchen. The broil­er was in work­ing request and there was ledge space enough for the blender, and that was ade­quate for me.

The fre­quent expe­ri­ence of the cook liv­ing in the coun­try or sub­urbs these days to receive unex­pect­ed vis­its from friends who are tour­ing in auto­mo­biles, and she finds she must have some­thing attrac­tive, dain­ty and nour­ish­ing ready at a moment’s notice to sup­ple­ment the cup of tea or cof­fee so wel­come after a hot, dusty trip.

With a sup­ply of good eggs in the pantry the cook need nev­er be at a loss for a tasty cus­tard, and if she is wise enough to buy Armour’s Fan­cy Selects when she orders eggs from her mar­ket man their good­ness will be reflect­ed in her desserts. Aside from their good­ness their extra large size will always rec­om­mend their use to the wise cook.

There is inspi­ra­tion in the art that enters into the pro­duc­tion of a French din­ner, in the per­fect bal­ance of every item from hors d’oeuvre to café noir, in the ways with sea­son­ing that work mir­a­cles with left-overs and pre­serve the dai­ly rou­tine of three meals a day from the dead­ly monot­o­ny of the Amer­i­can régime.

It is impos­si­ble to deal in a short arti­cle with the many vari­eties of Sum­mer Sauce, but there are three or four which can be touched upon. To have a thor­ough under­stand­ing of their good­ness one must not only read about them but taste them. They are the sta­ple diet in many for­eign coun­tries and in the Armour brand the native fla­vor­ing has been done with remark­able faithfulness—so much so that large quan­ti­ties are shipped from this coun­try every week to the coun­tries where they orig­i­nat­ed.

Homemade Kefir and Honey-Roasted Banana Kefir Smoothie

  • Serv­ings: 4–6
  • Dif­fi­cul­ty: easy
  • Print

For the hon­eyed pear top­ping, have ready a sheet of puff-paste made of five ounces of sift­ed flour, and a quar­ter of a pound of fresh but­ter. Lay the paste in a but­tered soup-plate. Trim and notch the edges, and then put in the mix­ture. Bake it about half an hour, in a mod­er­ate oven. Grate loaf-sug­ar over it, before you send it to table.

Ingredients

  • 34 cup almond milk
  • 1 tea­spoon vanil­la extract
  • 12 tea­spoon cin­na­mon
  • 14 tea­spoon salt
  • 1 tea­spoon orange zest
  • 1 cup flour
  • 2 table­spoons pow­dered sug­ar
  • 34 cup but­ter
  • 12 cup sug­ar
  • 1 egg yolk

Directions

  1. Boil the sug­ar, water and tar­tar­ic acid five min­utes. When near­ly cold beat into the syrup the whites of the eggs, beat­en until foamy, and the fla­vor­ing extract. Store in a fruit jar, close­ly cov­ered. To use, put three table­spoon­fuls into a glass half full of cold water, stir in one-fourth a tea­spoon­ful of soda, and drink while effer­vesc­ing.
  2. A pint of any kind of fruit juice may dis­place the water, when a tea­spoon­ful of lemon juice should be added to the con­tents of each glass before stir­ring in the soda.
  3. Pre­heat the oven to 350 degrees Fahren­heit. Grate the choco­late, put it in a dou­ble boil­er with the milk; stir until hot, and add the sug­ar, vanil­la, cin­na­mon and one pint of the cream. When cold, freeze; when frozen, remove the dash­er and stir in the remain­ing pint of the cream whipped to a stiff froth.
  4. In a large bowl, mix togeth­er the flour, salt, bak­ing pow­der, bak­ing soda, and cin­na­mon. Mash the rasp­ber­ries; add half the sug­ar and the lemon juice. Put the remain­ing sug­ar and half the cream in a dou­ble boil­er; stir until the sug­ar is dis­solved, and stand aside to cool; when cold, add the remain­ing cream, turn the mix­ture into the freez­er, and stir until part­ly frozen.
  5. Place the pans in the oven and bake for 40–50 min­utes, or until they’re gold­en around the edges. In mak­ing pies of juicy fruit, it is a good way to set a small tea-cup on the bot­tom crust, and lay the fruit all round it. The juice will col­lect under the cup, and not run out at the edges or top of the pie.

Tips & Tricks: Fruit pies with lids, should have loaf-sug­ar grat­ed over them. If they have been baked the day before, they should be warmed in the stove, or near the fire, before they are sent to table, to soft­en the crust, and make them taste fresh. Rasp­ber­ry and apple-pies are much improved by tak­ing off the lid, and pour­ing in a lit­tle cream just before they go to table. Replace the lid very care­ful­ly.

Since most oth­er folks just bring booze, the cook­ies are always a wel­come addi­tion. I made the fill­ing two dif­fer­ent ways here, for the first one I cooked down some cran­ber­ries with sug­ar, then mixed that with Ver­mont Cream­ery, mas­car­pone cheese and spices for a tangy, cheese­cake-y, and slight­ly sweet fill­ing. For the oth­er, I sliced per­sim­mons and boiled them in a cin­na­mon syrup until they soft­ened, then I cut shapes out of them with a cook­ie cut­ter so that they would fit in the linz­er cook­ie sand­wich­es.

To have a thor­ough under­stand­ing of their good­ness one must not only read about them but taste them. They are the sta­ple diet in many for­eign coun­tries and in the Armour brand the native fla­vor­ing has been done with remark­able faithfulness—so much so that large quan­ti­ties are shipped from this coun­try every week to the coun­tries where they orig­i­nat­ed.

Pud­dings that are pre­pared by boil­ing, steam­ing, and bak­ing, and the sauces that make them appe­tiz­ing, receive a good­ly share of atten­tion. Pas­tries and Pies com­pletes this vol­ume, round­ing out, as it were, the cook’s under­stand­ing of dessert mak­ing. To many per­sons, pas­try mak­ing is an intri­cate mat­ter, but with the prin­ci­ples thor­ough­ly explained and each step clear­ly illus­trat­ed, deli­cious pies of every vari­ety, as well as puff-paste dain­ties, may be had with very lit­tle effort.

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