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Blackberry & Creamy Goat Cheese Sticky Buns

“Rav­ig­ote” means, lit­er­al­ly, “pick me up” and it is applied to minced tar­ragon, chervil, chives and pars­ley, the herbs being kept sep­a­rate and served with sal­ad on four lit­tle saucers. Rav­ig­ote but­ter, made by knead­ing but­ter with the four herbs and adding pep­per, salt and lemon juice, spread between thin slices of bread, makes deli­cious sand­wich­es.

How to make pure food, bet­ter food and to econ­o­mize on the cost of same is just now tax­ing the atten­tion and inge­nu­ity of domes­tic sci­ence teach­ers and food experts gen­er­al­ly. The aver­age cook is intense­ly inter­est­ed in the result of these find­ings, and must keep in touch with them to keep up with the times and run her home in an intel­li­gent and eco­nom­i­cal as well as health­ful rou­tine.

I didn’t have to stir it quite as often as I usu­al­ly do when I make jam, and I think it was because the heat was com­ing at the peach­es equal­ly from all sides of the pot which helped cook every­thing at the same pace, and made my cook­ing job eas­i­er since I didn’t have to hov­er around the pot.

They are par­tic­u­lar, how­ev­er, to be con­sis­tent in the use of gar­nish­ings. Flow­ers and fruits are reserved for sweet dish­es, except in the case of nas­tur­tiums, which they regard as much a veg­etable as a flower and use freely with meats. It isn’t essen­tial that every dish should be turned into an elab­o­rate work of art.

Aside from their good­ness their extra large size will always rec­om­mend their use to the wise cook. They come packed in an extra large car­ton. It is a wise plan to keep a vari­ety of Sum­mer Sausage on hand, as in a very few min­utes deli­cious sand­wich­es may be pre­pared with this, these sand­wich­es hav­ing the charm of nov­el­ty. It is impos­si­ble to deal in a short arti­cle with the many vari­eties of Sum­mer Sausage, but there are three or four which can be touched upon. To have a thor­ough under­stand­ing of their good­ness one must not only read about them but taste them.

An ordi­nary bread pud­ding becomes ver­i­ta­bly a queen of 14 pud­dings as, indeed, it is called, mere­ly by hav­ing a lay­er of jam through its cen­tre and a sim­ple icing spread over the top. The sim­ple desserts are the best desserts, and none is more pleas­ing to the eye and the palate or so eas­i­ly made or so fre­quent­ly served in an imper­fect man­ner, than cus­tards.

Blackberry & Creamy Goat Cheese Sticky Buns

  • Serv­ings: 4–6
  • Dif­fi­cul­ty: easy
  • Print

Before using lemons for any pur­pose, always roll them awhile with your hand on a table. This will cause them to yield a larg­er quan­ti­ty of juice.

Ingredients

  • 34 cup unsalt­ed cul­tured but­ter
  • 12 cup sug­ar
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 tea­spoon vanil­la extract
  • 1 tea­spoon orange zest
  • 1 cup flour
  • 34 cup almond meal
  • 12 tea­spoon cin­na­mon
  • 14 tea­spoon salt
  • 2 table­spoons pow­dered sug­ar

Directions

  1. Boil the sug­ar, water and tar­tar­ic acid five min­utes. When near­ly cold beat into the syrup the whites of the eggs, beat­en until foamy, and the fla­vor­ing extract. Store in a fruit jar, close­ly cov­ered. To use, put three table­spoon­fuls into a glass half full of cold water, stir in one-fourth a tea­spoon­ful of soda, and drink while effer­vesc­ing.
  2. A pint of any kind of fruit juice may dis­place the water, when a tea­spoon­ful of lemon juice should be added to the con­tents of each glass before stir­ring in the soda.
  3. Pre­heat the oven to 350 degrees Fahren­heit. Grate the choco­late, put it in a dou­ble boil­er with the milk; stir until hot, and add the sug­ar, vanil­la, cin­na­mon and one pint of the cream. When cold, freeze; when frozen, remove the dash­er and stir in the remain­ing pint of the cream whipped to a stiff froth.
  4. In a large bowl, mix togeth­er the flour, salt, bak­ing pow­der, bak­ing soda, and cin­na­mon. Mash the rasp­ber­ries; add half the sug­ar and the lemon juice. Put the remain­ing sug­ar and half the cream in a dou­ble boil­er; stir until the sug­ar is dis­solved, and stand aside to cool; when cold, add the remain­ing cream, turn the mix­ture into the freez­er, and stir until part­ly frozen.
  5. Place the pans in the oven and bake for 40–50 min­utes, or until they’re gold­en around the edges. In mak­ing pies of juicy fruit, it is a good way to set a small tea-cup on the bot­tom crust, and lay the fruit all round it. The juice will col­lect under the cup, and not run out at the edges or top of the pie.

Tips & Tricks: Have ready a sheet of puff-paste made of five ounces of sift­ed flour, and a quar­ter of a pound of fresh but­ter. Lay the paste in a but­tered soup-plate. Trim and notch the edges, and then put in the mix­ture. Bake it about half an hour, in a mod­er­ate oven. Grate loaf-sug­ar over it, before you send it to table.

An ordi­nary bread pud­ding becomes ver­i­ta­bly a queen of 14 pud­dings as, indeed, it is called, mere­ly by hav­ing a lay­er of jam through its cen­tre and a sim­ple icing spread over the top. The sim­ple desserts are the best desserts, and none is more pleas­ing to the eye and the palate or so eas­i­ly made or so fre­quent­ly served in an imper­fect man­ner, than cus­tards.

There is inspi­ra­tion in the art that enters into the pro­duc­tion of a French din­ner, in the per­fect bal­ance of every item from hors d’oeuvre to café noir, in the ways with sea­son­ing that work mir­a­cles with left-overs and pre­serve the dai­ly rou­tine of three meals a day from the dead­ly monot­o­ny of the Amer­i­can régime, in the gar­nish­ings that glo­ri­fy the most insignif­i­cant con­coc­tions into objects of appetis­ing beau­ty and in the sauces that ele­vate indif­fer­ent dish­es into the realm of cre­ations and enable a French cook to turn out a din­ner fit for capri­cious young gods from what an Amer­i­can cook wastes in prepar­ing one.

They are the sta­ple diet in many for­eign coun­tries and in the Armour brand the native fla­vor­ing has been done with remark­able faithfulness—so much so that large quan­ti­ties are shipped from this coun­try every week to the coun­tries where they orig­i­nat­ed.

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