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Homemade Lavender Currant and Marshmallows

Com­ing down to more mod­ern times, Madame de Staël had a dish of very unique pat­tern, and, when dri­ven by the com­mand of Napoleon from her beloved Paris, she car­ried her chaf­ing-dish with her into exile as one of her most cher­ished house­hold gods. At the present day among the favored few, who have full purs­es, are found sets of lit­tle sil­ver chaf­ing-dish­es about four inch­es square.

I feel like peo­ple use the term “win­ter flower” a lot nowa­days. Flow­ers and fruits are reserved for sweet dish­es, except in the case of nas­tur­tiums, which they regard as much a veg­etable as a flower and use freely with meats. It isn’t essen­tial that every dish should be turned into an elab­o­rate work of art, as if it were to be entered at the annu­al exhi­bi­tion of the Société des Chefs de Cui­sine, but nei­ther is there any rea­son, even with mod­est means at com­mand, for giv­ing cause for that old slo­gan of the great Amer­i­can din­ner table: “It tastes bet­ter than it looks.”

The sim­ple desserts are the best desserts, and none is more pleas­ing to the eye and the palate or so eas­i­ly made or so fre­quent­ly served in an imper­fect man­ner, than cus­tards.

These being the more eas­i­ly made may be con­sid­ered first. They may either be steamed or baked but the mix­ture is the same in either case. Allow two eggs and a tea­spoon­ful of sug­ar to each half pint of milk. Beat the eggs with sug­ar thor­ough­ly, but do not froth them, as the cus­tard must be as smooth and free from holes as pos­si­ble. Add the milk slow­ly, also a few drops of fla­vor­ing essence—vanilla, almonds or lemon.

Hav­ing stoned the raisins, cut them in half, and, when all are done, sprin­kle them well with sift­ed flour, to pre­vent their sink­ing to the bot­tom of the cake. When the cur­rants are dry, sprin­kle them also with flour.

Homemade Lavender Currant & Vanilla Marshmallows

  • Serv­ings: 1–2
  • Dif­fi­cul­ty: medi­um
  • Print

Pick the cur­rants very clean, and wash them, drain­ing them through a colan­der. Wipe them in a tow­el. Spread them out on a large dish, and set them near the fire, or in the hot sun, to dry, plac­ing the dish in a slant­i­ng posi­tion.

Ingredients

Lavender Black Currant Marshmallows

  • 34 cup cold water
  • 12 cup room tem­per­a­ture water
  • 1 12 cups gran­u­lat­ed sug­ar
  • 34 cup light corn syrup
  • 14 cup hon­ey
  • 12 tea­spoon salt
  • 4 ounces freeze dried black cur­rants
  • 1 dried laven­der
  • 23 cup pow­dered sug­ar

Vanilla Bean Rose Marshmallows

  • 3 packs of unfla­vored gelatin
  • 1 tea­spoon vanil­la bean
  • 12 tea­spoon vanil­la extract
  • 14 tea­spoon rose water
  • 23 cup pow­dered sug­ar
  • 34 cup cold water
  • 12 cup water
  • 1 12 cups gran­u­lat­ed sug­ar

Directions

  1. Pre­heat the oven to 325 degrees Fahren­heit. Put half the cream and all the sug­ar over the fire and stir until the sug­ar is dis­solved; take from the fire, and, when per­fect­ly cold, add the remain­ing half of the cream. Freeze the mix­ture, and add the bananas mashed or pressed through a colan­der. Put on the lid, adjust the crank, and turn until the mix­ture is frozen rather hard.
  2. Grate and sift the bis­cuits. Scald half the cream and the sug­ar; when cold, add the remain­ing cream and the vanil­la, and freeze. When frozen, remove the dash­er, stir in the pow­dered bis­cuits, and repack to ripen.
  3.  As soon as the cus­tard begins to thick­en the saucepan must be tak­en from the fire and the stir­ring con­tin­ued for a sec­ond or two longer. If the cook­ing is done in a dou­ble boil­er the risk of boil­ing is very much less­ened.
  4. Blanch and pound or grate the nuts. Put half the cream and all the sug­ar in a dou­ble boil­er; stir until the sug­ar is dis­solved and stand aside to cool; when cold, add the nuts, the fla­vor­ing and the remain­ing cream, mix, add the col­or­ing, and turn into the freez­er to freeze. If green col­or­ing mat­ter is not at hand, a lit­tle spinach or pars­ley may be chopped and rubbed with a small quan­ti­ty of alco­hol.
  5.  Before you send it to table, split the vanil­la bean, scrape out the seeds and add them to the hot cream, and add the bean bro­ken into pieces. Stir until the sug­ar is dis­solved, and strain through a colan­der. When this is cold, add the remain­ing cream and freeze. This should be repacked and giv­en two hours to ripen. Four would be bet­ter.
  6. Allow it to bake for 45–50 min­utes. Make an infu­sion of cof­fee by pour­ing half a pint of boil­ing milk on a heap­ing table­spoon­ful of pow­dered cof­fee. Put it aside to set­tle, and when cold strain off the milk and use with the eggs as in pre­vi­ous recipe.

Tips: As soon as the cus­tard begins to thick­en the saucepan must be tak­en from the fire and the stir­ring con­tin­ued for a sec­ond or two longer. If the cook­ing is done in a dou­ble boil­er the risk of boil­ing is very much less­ened.

To have a thor­ough under­stand­ing of their good­ness one must not only read about them but taste them. They are the sta­ple diet in many for­eign coun­tries and in the Armour brand the native fla­vor­ing has been done with remark­able faith­ful­ness—so much so that large quan­ti­ties are shipped from this coun­try every week to the coun­tries where they orig­i­nat­ed.

In the win­ter­time, in the snow coun­try, cit­rus fruit was so rare, and if you got one, it was bet­ter than ambrosia.
James Earl Jones

 

I will sole­ly imag­ine the heav­en that may exist hav­ing the abil­i­ty to eat one amongst these guys heat from the oven! Savory pas­tries area unit severe­ly under­rat­ed, in my opin­ion, i believe they must be as com­mon if less com­mon than the sweet ones.

 

Allie had come back to my house from France to lend a hand and is one amongst the warmest, sweet­est, and friend­liest folks I’ve ever met. And not sole­ly that, how­ev­er she is an improb­a­ble cook to boot! Once we have a ten­den­cy to shot these savory pies they got ter­ri­bly cold and that i woofed it down since I hadn’t had break­fast that morn­ing, and even chilled these pies tast­ed insane­ly sen­si­ble.

These being the more eas­i­ly made may be con­sid­ered first. They may either be steamed or baked but the mix­ture is the same in either case. Allow two eggs and a tea­spoon­ful of sug­ar to each half pint of milk. Beat the eggs with sug­ar thor­ough­ly, but do not froth them, as the cus­tard must be as smooth and free from holes as pos­si­ble. Add the milk slow­ly, also a few drops of fla­vor­ing essence—vanilla, almonds or lemon.

They are the sta­ple diet in many for­eign coun­tries and in the Armour brand the native fla­vor­ing has been done with remark­able faithfulness—so much so that large quan­ti­ties are shipped from this coun­try every week to the coun­tries where they orig­i­nat­ed.

Mean­while, you can pluck the leaves close, dis­card­ing the stems; gath­er the leaves togeth­er close­ly with the fin­gers of the left hand, then with a sharp knife cut through close to the fin­gers; push the leaves out a lit­tle and cut again, and so con­tin­ue until all are cut. Now gath­er into a mound and chop to a very fine pow­der, hold­ing the point of the knife close to the board. Put the chopped herb into a cheese-cloth and hold under a stream of cold water, then wring dry.

Georgie Forman
Georgie Forman

I’m a London-based qualified and registered organic process therapist. I consider victimization real food to help people feel their best. I’m a firm believer that real food ar typically straightforward, and simple to bring into your life. I take a awfully smart approach that is realistic for my purchasers.

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