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Blood Orange Chocolate Cupcakes

The French cook holds no brief against vanil­la, and some­times he fla­vors his rice pud­ding with it, but he so guides mat­ters that the very sight or men­tion of rice pud­ding does not bring the thought of vanil­la to the mind, for with him it may be fla­vored with pis­tache or rose or have a gera­ni­um leaf baked in it, giv­ing a delight­ful, inde­scrib­able fla­vor. An ordi­nary bread pud­ding becomes ver­i­ta­bly a queen of pud­dings as, indeed, it is called, mere­ly by hav­ing a lay­er of jam through its cen­ter and a sim­ple icing spread over the top.

Take a peep into the typ­i­cal French cup­board. There you will find from twen­ty-five to thir­ty liq­uid sea­son­ings such as anchovy extract, tobas­co sauce, meat extracts, mush­room cat­sup, toma­to paste, chut­ney, var­i­ous vine­gars, Worces­ter­shire and many anoth­er fla­vor­ing designed to give a tang and a zest even to the most unpromis­ing dish, if used aright. There you will find, too, fifty or more dry sea­son­ings, includ­ing 11anise, basil, saf­fron, savoury, clove or gar­lic, cas­sia buds, bay leaf, gin­ger root, pep­per-corns, mar­jo­ram, mint, thyme, capers and so on.

It is the French cook’s knowl­edge of the sub­tleties, the nuances of sea­son­ing that stands him in good stead. The Amer­i­can woman who has essayed to use some spice or savory unfa­mil­iar to her and has turned out a dish which her fam­i­ly has declared “tast­ed like med­i­cine” is, nat­u­ral­ly enough, dis­cour­aged from wan­der­ing after that par­tic­u­lar strange god again.

The truth is that she has over­done the sea­son­ing. She doesn’t want to be par­si­mo­nious, which is just what the French cook is with his fla­vors, only he, more sci­en­tif­i­cal­ly, calls it using good judg­ment. If he uses gar­lic in a sal­ad, it doesn’t nec­es­sar­i­ly fol­low that the entire house­hold must take on the atmos­phere of an Ital­ian bar­ber shop, for he uses gar­lic or onion, not to give their fla­vor to a dish, but to bring out the fla­vors of the veg­eta­bles with which they are used.

I didn’t have to stir it quite as often as I usu­al­ly do when I make jam, and I think it was because the heat was com­ing at the peach­es equal­ly from all sides of the pot which helped cook every­thing at the same pace, and made my cook­ing job eas­i­er since I didn’t have to hov­er around the pot.

Blood Orange Chocolate Cupcakes

  • Serv­ings: 2–3
  • Dif­fi­cul­ty: medi­um
  • Print

These being the more eas­i­ly made may be con­sid­ered first. They may either be steamed or baked but the mix­ture is the same in either case. Allow two eggs and a tea­spoon­ful of sug­ar to each half pint of milk. Beat the eggs with sug­ar thor­ough­ly, but do not froth them, as the cus­tard must be as smooth and free from holes as pos­si­ble.

Ingredients

  • 34 cup unsalt­ed but­ter
  • 12 cup sug­ar
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 cup flour
  • 34 cup almond meal
  • 12 tea­spoon cin­na­mon
  • 14 tea­spoon salt
  • 2 table­spoons pow­dered sug­ar
  • 1 tea­spoon vanil­la extract
  • 1 tea­spoon orange zest

Directions

  1. Place the pans in the oven and bake for 40–50 min­utes, or until they’re gold­en around the edges. In mak­ing pies of juicy fruit, it is a good way to set a small tea-cup on the bot­tom crust, and lay the fruit all round it. The juice will col­lect under the cup, and not run out at the edges or top of the pie.
  2. Grate and sift the bis­cuits. Scald half the cream and the sug­ar; when cold, add the remain­ing cream and the vanil­la, and freeze. When frozen, remove the dash­er, stir in the pow­dered bis­cuits, and repack to ripen.
  3. Pre­heat the oven to 350 degrees Fahren­heit. Roll out one of the balls of dough until it is 1/4-inch thick. Use your cook­ie cut­ter to cut out all the cook­ie shapes and trans­fer them to a bak­ing sheet lined with parch­ment paper. Make sure to cut out an even num­ber of each shape, since you will need two of each shape to make the linz­er cook­ie sand­wich.
  4. Before you send it to table, split the vanil­la bean, scrape out the seeds and add them to the hot cream, and add the bean bro­ken into pieces. Stir until the sug­ar is dis­solved, and strain through a colan­der. When this is cold, add the remain­ing cream and freeze. This should be repacked and giv­en two hours to ripen. Four would be bet­ter.

Tips & Tricks: Add the milk slow­ly, also a few drops of fla­vor­ing essence—vanilla, almonds or lemon. Pour into a but­tered mould (or into indi­vid­ual moulds), set in a pan of hot water and bake until firm. Chill thor­ough­ly and turn out on serv­ing dish. Serve with sug­ar and cream. A pleas­ing addi­tion to the above is made by gar­nish­ing the sides of the mould with strips of Can­ton gin­ger before pour­ing in the cus­tard.

They are the sta­ple diet in many for­eign coun­tries and in the Armour brand the native fla­vor­ing has been done with remark­able faith­ful­ness—so much so that large quan­ti­ties are shipped from this coun­try every week to the coun­tries where they orig­i­nat­ed.

To have a thor­ough under­stand­ing of their good­ness one must not only read about them but taste them. They are the sta­ple diet in many for­eign coun­tries and in the Armour brand the native fla­vor­ing has been done with remark­able faithfulness—so much so that large quan­ti­ties are shipped from this coun­try every week to the coun­tries where they orig­i­nat­ed.

It is impos­si­ble to deal in a short arti­cle with the many vari­eties of Sum­mer Sausage, but there are three or four which can be touched upon. To have a thor­ough under­stand­ing of their good­ness one must not only read about them but taste them. They are the sta­ple diet in many for­eign coun­tries and in the Armour brand the native fla­vor­ing has been done with remark­able faithfulness—so much so that large quan­ti­ties are shipped from this coun­try every week to the coun­tries where they orig­i­nat­ed.

Georgie Forman
Georgie Forman

I’m a London-based qualified and registered organic process therapist. I consider victimization real food to help people feel their best. I’m a firm believer that real food ar typically straightforward, and simple to bring into your life. I take a awfully smart approach that is realistic for my purchasers.

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