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Baked Buttermilk Doughnuts with a Strawberry Rhubarb Brown Butter Glaze

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Hey guys! As a Dietitian Nutritionist, nutrition is my jam. NS—your source for a balanced wellbeing. Here you’ll find simple and delicious recipes, an awesome community, health advice, and all things to keep you feeling your best. Live Whole. Eat Well. Feel Amazing.

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With the kitchen redesign mov­ing grad­u­al­ly, I was expe­ri­enc­ing con­sid­er­able dif­fi­cul­ties hav­ing the capac­i­ty to cook for a devel­oped time­frame, par­tic­u­lar­ly since cook­ing is one of my favored tech­niques for stress alle­vi­a­tion. In this way, this past Fri­day I said ‘to hell­fire with it’ and made a cake in my half torn down kitchen. The broil­er was in work­ing request and there was ledge space enough for the blender, and that was ade­quate for me.

I also had quite a few peach­es on the counter that were get­ting a bit too ripe, so I sim­mered them all down into a jam. This is great for when peach­es get too soft to slice prop­er­ly and just kind of turn to mush in your hands when you try to pull the sliced parts off – you still get to keep all the peachy fla­vor, and the mushi­ness doesn’t mat­ter once it cooks down into a soft, fruity com­pote.

They are par­tic­u­lar, how­ev­er, to be con­sis­tent in the use of gar­nish­ings. Flow­ers and fruits are reserved for sweet dish­es, except in the case of nas­tur­tiums, which they regard as much a veg­etable as a flower and use freely with meats. It isn’t essen­tial that every dish should be turned into an elab­o­rate work of art, as if it were to be entered at the annu­al exhi­bi­tion of the Société des Chefs de Cui­sine, but nei­ther is there any rea­son, even with mod­est means at com­mand, for giv­ing cause for that old slo­gan of the great Amer­i­can din­ner table: “It tastes bet­ter than it looks.”

Vanil­la and lemon have an almost uni­ver­sal appeal to the palate, and know­ing this, the Amer­i­can cook, like the gen­er­a­tion before her, has always sea­soned her rice pud­dings, for instance, with one or the oth­er, just as her apple sauce has invari­ably been fla­vored with lemon or nut­meg, her bread pud­ding with vanil­la, and so all along her restrict­ed line. An ordi­nary bread pud­ding becomes ver­i­ta­bly a queen of 14puddings as, indeed, it is called, mere­ly by hav­ing a lay­er of jam through its cen­tre and a sim­ple icing spread over the top.

A stew or a creamed dish is mere­ly a more or less indif­fer­ent some­thing to eat when it is dished up any old way and set upon the table. But if it is heaped dain­ti­ly on a pret­ty plat­ter, sur­round­ed by a ring of brown mashed pota­to, its sides dec­o­rat­ed by dain­ty shapes of toast­ed bread, per­haps but­tered and sprin­kled with minced pars­ley, it has become some­thing to awak­en the slum­ber­ing or indif­fer­ent appetite and at prac­ti­cal­ly no extra expense of time or mon­ey.

It isn’t essen­tial that every dish should be turned into an elab­o­rate work of art, as if it were to be entered at the annu­al exhi­bi­tion of the Société des Chefs de Cui­sine, but nei­ther is there any rea­son, even with mod­est means at com­mand, for giv­ing cause for that old slo­gan of the great Amer­i­can din­ner table: “It tastes bet­ter than it looks.”

Baked Buttermilk Doughnuts with a Strawberry Rhubarb Brown Butter Glaze

  • Serv­ings: 4–6
  • Dif­fi­cul­ty: easy
  • Print
  1. Remove from heat and lift out tea bags. Serve warm and store any left­overs in the fridge in an air­tight con­tain­er for up to 10 days.

Ingredients

  • 2 table­spoons unsalt­ed but­ter
  • 2 tea­spoons rose­mary
  • 1 tea­spoon flake sea salt
  • 1 cup raw shelled nuts
  • 14 cup light brown sug­ar
  • 12 tea­spoon chili flakes


Directions

  • Boil the sug­ar, water and tar­tar­ic acid five min­utes. When near­ly cold beat into the syrup the whites of the eggs, beat­en until foamy, and the fla­vor­ing extract. Store in a fruit jar, close­ly cov­ered. To use, put three table­spoon­fuls into a glass half full of cold water, stir in one-fourth a tea­spoon­ful of soda, and drink while effer­vesc­ing.
  • A pint of any kind of fruit juice may dis­place the water, when a tea­spoon­ful of lemon juice should be added to the con­tents of each glass before stir­ring in the soda.
  • Pre­heat the oven to 350 degrees Fahren­heit. Grate the choco­late, put it in a dou­ble boil­er with the milk; stir until hot, and add the sug­ar, vanil­la, cin­na­mon and one pint of the cream. When cold, freeze; when frozen, remove the dash­er and stir in the remain­ing pint of the cream whipped to a stiff froth.
  • In a large bowl, mix togeth­er the flour, salt, bak­ing pow­der, bak­ing soda, and cin­na­mon. Mash the rasp­ber­ries; add half the sug­ar and the lemon juice. Put the remain­ing sug­ar and half the cream in a dou­ble boil­er; stir until the sug­ar is dis­solved, and stand aside to cool; when cold, add the remain­ing cream, turn the mix­ture into the freez­er, and stir until part­ly frozen.
  • Place the pans in the oven and bake for 40–50 min­utes, or until they’re gold­en around the edges. In mak­ing pies of juicy fruit, it is a good way to set a small tea-cup on the bot­tom crust, and lay the fruit all round it. The juice will col­lect under the cup, and not run out at the edges or top of the pie.

Tips & Tricks: Fruit pies with lids, should have loaf-sug­ar grat­ed over them. If they have been baked the day before, they should be warmed in the stove, or near the fire, before they are sent to table, to soft­en the crust, and make them taste fresh. Rasp­ber­ry and apple-pies are much improved by tak­ing off the lid, and pour­ing in a lit­tle cream just before they go to table. Replace the lid very care­ful­ly.

Vanil­la and lemon have an almost uni­ver­sal appeal to the palate, and know­ing this, the Amer­i­can cook, like the gen­er­a­tion before her, has always sea­soned her rice pud­dings, for instance, with one or the oth­er, just as her apple sauce has invari­ably been fla­vored with lemon or nut­meg, her bread pud­ding with vanil­la, and so all along her restrict­ed line. An ordi­nary bread pud­ding becomes ver­i­ta­bly a queen of 14 pud­dings as, indeed, it is called, mere­ly by hav­ing a lay­er of jam through its cen­tre and a sim­ple icing spread over the top.

A stew or a creamed dish is mere­ly a more or less indif­fer­ent some­thing to eat when it is dished up any old way and set upon the table. But if it is heaped dain­ti­ly on a pret­ty plat­ter, sur­round­ed by a ring of brown mashed pota­to, its sides dec­o­rat­ed by dain­ty shapes of toast­ed bread, per­haps but­tered and sprin­kled with minced pars­ley, it has become some­thing to awak­en the slum­ber­ing or indif­fer­ent appetite and at prac­ti­cal­ly no extra expense of time or mon­ey.

They are par­tic­u­lar, how­ev­er, to be con­sis­tent in the use of gar­nish­ings. Flow­ers and fruits are reserved for sweet dish­es, except in the case of nas­tur­tiums, which they regard as much a veg­etable as a flower and use freely with meats. It isn’t essen­tial that every dish should be turned into an elab­o­rate work of art.

Fear no mess; it just means you’re a nor­mal, func­tion­ing human being.

They are the sta­ple diet in many for­eign coun­tries and in the Armour brand the native fla­vor­ing has been done with remark­able faithfulness—so much so that large quan­ti­ties are shipped from this coun­try every week to the coun­tries where they orig­i­nat­ed.

A stew or a creamed dish is mere­ly a more or less indif­fer­ent some­thing to eat when it is dished up any old way and set upon the table. But if it is heaped dain­ti­ly on a pret­ty plat­ter, sur­round­ed by a ring of brown mashed pota­to, its sides dec­o­rat­ed by dain­ty shapes of toast­ed bread, per­haps but­tered and sprin­kled with minced pars­ley.

I didn’t have to stir it quite as often as I usu­al­ly do when I make jam, and I think it was because the heat was com­ing at the peach­es equal­ly from all sides of the pot which helped cook every­thing at the same pace, and made my cook­ing job eas­i­er since I didn’t have to hov­er around the pot. It has become some­thing to awak­en the slum­ber­ing or indif­fer­ent appetite and at prac­ti­cal­ly no extra expense of time or mon­ey.

Vanil­la and lemon have an almost uni­ver­sal appeal to the palate, and know­ing this, the Amer­i­can cook, like the gen­er­a­tion before her, has always sea­soned her rice pud­dings, for instance, with one or the oth­er, just as her apple sauce has invari­ably been fla­vored with lemon or nut­meg.

The word “Rav­ig­ote” means, lit­er­al­ly, “pick me up” and it is applied to minced tar­ragon, chervil, chives and pars­ley, the herbs being kept sep­a­rate and served with sal­ad on four lit­tle saucers. Rav­ig­ote but­ter, made by knead­ing but­ter with the four herbs and adding pep­per, salt and lemon juice, spread between thin slices of bread, makes deli­cious sand­wich­es.

Aside from their good­ness their extra large size will always rec­om­mend their use to the wise cook. Flow­ers and fruits are reserved for sweet dish­es, except in the case of nas­tur­tiums, which they regard as much a veg­etable as a flower and use freely with meats. It isn’t essen­tial that every dish should be turned into an elab­o­rate work of art.

With a sup­ply of good eggs in the pantry the cook need nev­er be at a loss for a tasty cus­tard, and if she is wise enough to buy Armour’s Fan­cy Selects when she orders eggs from her mar­ket man their good­ness will be reflect­ed in her desserts. Aside from their good­ness their extra large size will always rec­om­mend their use to the wise cook.

There is inspi­ra­tion in the art that enters into the pro­duc­tion of a French din­ner, in the per­fect bal­ance of every item from hors d’oeuvre to café noir, in the ways with sea­son­ing that work mir­a­cles with left-overs and pre­serve the dai­ly rou­tine of three meals a day from the dead­ly monot­o­ny of the Amer­i­can régime.

It isn’t essen­tial that every dish should be turned into an elab­o­rate work of art, as if it were to be entered at the annu­al exhi­bi­tion of the Société des Chefs de Cui­sine, but nei­ther is there any rea­son, even with mod­est means at com­mand, for giv­ing cause for that old slo­gan of the great Amer­i­can din­ner table: “It tastes bet­ter than it looks.”

Blanche Houston
Blanche Houston

I’m a Dietitian Nutritionist, nutrition is my jam. NS—your source for a balanced wellbeing. Here you’ll find simple and delicious recipes, an awesome community, health advice, and all things to keep you feeling your best. Eat Well. Feel Amazing.

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